Articles in print journals and magazines (2007)

8) Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr (2007). La imponente Belleza de las Armas Blancas Persas Elaboradas con Acero de Damasco. Revista de Artes Marciales Asiáticas, Volumen 2 Número 4 (32–45), pp. 32–45.

 

"El objetivo de este artículo es ofrecer una breve panorámica de las diversas tipologías de un producto denominado “Acero de Damasco” y mostrar su belleza a través de ejemplos de armas blancas. A lo largo del presente artículo utilizo indistintamente los términos “acero de Damasco”, “acero al agua” y “acero al crisol”, explicándolos detalladamente. . . . "

Place of publication: Spain

 

Online version of the article

7) Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr (2007). Dagger of the Ayyārān, Classic Arms and Militaria. Classic Arms and Militaria, Volume XIV Issue 6, pp. 25–29.

 

"The khanjar (plural: khanjarha curved double-edged Persian dagger. In the majority of Persian miniatures, the warriors are depicted holding a khanjar in a reverse grip. It is unclear when exactly the double-edged curved khanjar became fashionable and came to be used in Iran. . . . "

Place of publication: UK

 

Online version of the article

6) Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr (2007). Gedichte und Schwerter: Waffenklassifizierung und Tiegelstahlrezept des Omar Khayyam Neishaburi. Hephaistos, 11/12, pp. 26–27.

 

"Im Iran werden vor allem die Gedichte von Khayyam Neishaburi, aber auch seine wissenschaftlichen Leistungen gerühmt. Wenig bekannt ist, dass er sich auch mit der Typologie der Schwerter und der Herstellung von Tiegelstahl . . ."

Place of publication: Germany

 

Online version of the print article


5) Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr (2007).  The Weapons of Choice: The Art and Design of Sword Making and Carrying During the Reign of the Sassanian Zoroastrian Rulers is Expounded.  Parsiana, October 07, pp. 28-29.

 

"The sword was a symbol of rank and authority in the Sassanian period. In contrast to Achaemenian and Parthian kings, Sassanian kings adhered strictly to the teachings of Zoroastrianism. Therefore, there are no graves of Sassanian kings left since the burial of the dead was strictly forbidden, . . . "

Place of publication: India

 

Online version of the print article

4) Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr (2007). Blades of the Lion’s Tail: Birth of the Shamshir. Classic Arms and Militaria. Volume XIV Issue 5, pp.18-22.

 

"The famous Persian sword, the shamshir has enchanted many people in the Middle East and Europe for centuries with its beautiful patterns and shape. Persian shamshir blades were often purchased bare and mounted in Ottoman, Arab, or Caucasian fittings to suit local tastes, and many were later mounted with European military sword fittings. . . ."

Place of publication: UK

 

Online version of the article

3) Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr (2007). To the Memory of Ostad Haj Hossein Farajian. Persian Heritage, vol. 12, number 47, pp. 40–41.

 

"It was couple of years ago when I last met Mr. Haj Hossein Farajian in his shop in Zanjan.  I still remember that it was a hot afternoon.  The sun was shining, and we drove all the way through the highway between Tehran and Zanjan. . . ."

Place of publication: USA

 

Online version of the print article

2) Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr (2007). The Magnificent Beauty of Edged Weapons Made with Persian Watered Steel. Journal of Asian Martial Arts, 9 Volume 16, number 3, pp. 8–21.

 

"The art of metalwork in general and weapon-making in particular has a very long tradition in Iran, dating back to pre-historic times. In ancient Persian myths, one finds a number of splendid tales about the study and working of metal. In his epic Shahname, the great Persian poet Ferdowsi recounts the story of King Jamshid, a forger of iron weapons. . . . "

Place of publication: USA

 

Online version of the print article

© M.Khorasani Consulting