Ottoman Turkish armor in the Musée de l'Armée (Paris 2015)

The Musée de l'Armée has a very beautiful collection of Ottoman armor.  Some of them are shown here:

Museum description: A complete set of human and horse armor from Ottoman Turkey 1550.

The chest, belly, sides and back up to the shoulders are protected by overlapping steel plates facing upward to defend against spear thrusts executed by the enemy infantry.  The plates are integrated in a mail body armor made of riveted mail rings. For a similar Ottoman Turkish mail armor with integrated small steel plates for the chest, abdomen and back protection see Stone (1999, pp. 37-38), Glossary of the Construction, Decoration and Use of Arms and Use of Arms and Armor in all Countries and in all Times.  Originally Published in 1934.  Mineola: Dover Publications.

The knee caps are protected each by a rounded steel plate which is integrated in mail protection mesh made of riveted rings. The thighs are protected by small steel plates overlapping each other facing upwards. Further they are attached to riveted mail rings. For similar integrated plate knee cup protector integrated with mail links and attached to a combination of small plates and mail rings for the thigh protection see Astvatsaturjan, E.G (2002, p. 71), Турецкое оружие в собрании государственного исторического музея [Turkish Weapons in the Collection of the State Historical Museum].   Санкт Петербург   Д. А. Фебурин [Saint Petersburg: D. A Feburin].These knee guards are rounded in contrast to the ones on an identical Ottoman Turkish set kept in the State Hermitage Museum.  The sabaton (foot armor) consists of a mail mesh protection made of riveted rings for the rest of the foot. The shinguards consist of overlapping small steel plates facing upwards.  For another system of vaing solid steel plate see the Ottoman Turkish armor in the State Hermitage Museum.

The back of the hand is protected by one big steel pate and the fingers are protected by a thick leather glove.  For a different system of using multiplle steel plates which are connected to each other via riveted mail links see an identical Ottoman Turkisn armor in the Hermitage Museum. The  thumb is protected by other rows of steel plates connected to each other via riveted mail rings. The lower arm is protected by multiple small steel plates overlapping each other.  For a different system on an Ottoman Turkish armguard with two steel plates connected to each other via hinges see the piece in the Hermitage Museum.  For a similar armguard see Astvatsaturjan, E.G (2002, p. 72), Турецкое оружие в собрании государственного исторического музея [Turkish Weapons in the Collection of the State Historical Museum].   Санкт Петербург   Д. А. Фебурин [Saint Petersburg: D. A Feburin].  The helmet is in the style of an Ottoman Turkish style helmet (chichak - çiçak) from the 15th century.  The chamfron consists of five plates.  One big plate protects the whole face of the horse down to the nostrils. The plate is connected to a cheek plate on each side via riveted mail rings. Two other steel plates protect the horse ears. The whole body of the horse is protected by small steel plates overlapping each other downwards and connected to  each other on the side via riveted mail rings.  For a similar horse armour and chamfron from the 16-17 century see Astvatsaturjan, E.G (2002, p. 79), Турецкое оружие в собрании государственного исторического музея [Turkish Weapons in the Collection of the State Historical Museum].   Санкт Петербург   Д. А. Фебурин [Saint Petersburg: D. A Feburin].

Turban helmet attributed to Sultan Bayazet II (1481-1512): He was the son of Mehmet II, the conqueror of Constantinapole. The fluted turban helmet has a helmet spear and an adjustable nasal. The rim of the helmet is connected to a mail coif made of riveted rings protecting the whole neck, face and throat. It has also a forehead and backhead protection in the style of chichak (çiçak) helmet.  The whole surface of the helmet is beautifully gold-overlaid with inscriptions and floral design. For similar Turkish turban helmets see Stone (1999, pp. 41), Glossary of the Construction, Decoration and Use of Arms and Use of Arms and Armor in all Countries and in all Times.  Originally Published in 1934.  Mineola: Dover Publications.

Turban helmet attributed to Sultan Bayazet II (1481-1512): The gold-overlaid inscriptions read among other things "The courageous leader, the master of victory, the Sultan Bayazid, the Son of Sultan Mohammad Khan".

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Turban helmet attributed to Sultan Bayazet II (1481-1512):

A set of Turkish armor made of riveted mail rings and integarted steel plates together witha  turban helmet with the face protection made of riveted mail rings.

A gilded Ottoman Turkish style chichak (çiçak) helmet. The helmet is made of steel.  The surface of it are engraved, fluted, gilded and gold-overlaid.  The helmet is pointed.  This helmet is attributed to 1400-1450.

A turban helmet from 1480-1520.  The steel helmet is fluted and has an adjustable nasal.  The riveted mail mesh is missing. The surafce is etched showing inscriptions.

A turban helmet from 1480-1520.  The steel helmet is fluted and has an adjustable nasal.  The riveted mail mesh is missing. The surafce is etched showing inscriptions.

A turban helmet from 1480-1520.  The steel helmet is fluted. The nasal is missing and the riveted mail mesh are missing. The surafce is etched showing floral design.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A turban helmet from 1480-1520.  The steel helmet is flute. The nasal the riveted mail mesh are missing. The surafce is etched showing inscriptions and floral design.

A turban helmet from 1480-1520.  The steel helmet is fluted and has an adjustable nasal.  The riveted mail mesh is missing. The surafce is etched geometric design.

A turban helmet from 1480-1520.  The steel helmet is fluted and has an adjustable nasal.  The riveted mail mesh is missing. 

An Ottoman Turkish misurka (head mail cover) made of a top round steel plate and riveted rings.  The top of the head is protected by a steel bowl. The body protection is made of riveted steel rings with the lower rimmade of brass rings.  It has small silver decorations in shape of stars. The set is attributed to 1729 and was a diplomatic gift to the French court.  For a similar Turkish helmet from the 17th century without integrated cheekpieces see Astvatsaturjan, E.G (2002, p. 67, No 14674), Турецкое оружие в собрании государственного исторического музея [Turkish Weapons in the Collection of the State Historical Museum].   Санкт Петербург   Д. А. Фебурин [Sankt Petersburg: D. A Feburin].

Dr. Manouchehr Moshtagh Khorasani