Persian daggers & knives from the State Hermitage Museum (Saint Petersburg 2015); Manouchehr Moshtagh Khorasani

A magnificent Persian dagger from the 15th century in the State Hermitage Museum (Saint Petersburg, the Russian Federation).  The museum describes it as "Dagger, steel, wood, coloured stone, forging, carving, punching, engraving, etching, gold damascening, gilding, Iran, late 15th century - early 16 century; acquired in 1885-1886 from the Armoury of Tsarskoye Selo"

Ivanov (1975, pp. 65-66) describes this dagger as: "The original sheath and handle are also of steel, richly decorated in high relief with representations of dragons, birds, and kylins, and alsoa  vegetal design.  The background of the designs and part of the handle are covered with gold.  On the blade, near the handle, there is a vegetal design in relief on a gold background.  Only on this object is the inscription (Type 1) placed on two medalliens on the sheath, in nasta'liq script on  aplain background."

The inscription is a Persian poem and reads:

"I wanted so much to have a gleaming dagger.  That each of my ribs became a dagger (see Ivanov, 1975, p. 74)". Ivanov, A. (1975).  A Group of Iranian Daggers of the Period from the Fifteenth Century to the Beginning of the Seventeenth with Persian Inscriptions.  In: Robert Elgood (Ed.) Islamic Arms and Armor, pp. 64-77.

 

For an article on Persian khanjar see:

Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr (2007). Dagger of the Ayyārān, Classic Arms and Militaria. Classic Arms and Militaria, Volume XIV Issue 6, pp. 25–29.

 

For another article on Persian khanjar see:

Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr(2008). Persische Krummdolche. Militär & Geschichte, Nr. 40. August/September 2008, pp. 44–49.

Upper khanjar: A magnificent Persian khanjar dagger kept in the Hermitage Museum. This example is dated to 1242 AH (1826-1827). It was acquired in 1885-1886 from the Armoury of Tsarskoye Selo; in Prince Pyotr Saltykov's collection before 1861. The blade is made of steel.  the handle and wooden scabbard are made of copper covered with enamel. 

Lower khanjar: The blade is made of steel.  The handle and wooden scabbard are made of brass and covered with enamel in floral design. It was acquired in 1885-1886 from the Armoury of Tsarskoye Selo.  

 

For similar enamelled Persian khanjars see Khorasani (2006, cat 230-232, pp. 596-598):

Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr (2006). Arms and Armor from Iran: The Bronze Age to the End of the Qajar Period.  Tübingen: Legat Verlag.

 

For another enamelled Persian khanjar see Khorasani (2010, cat. 32):

Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr (2010). Lexicon of Arms and Armour from Iran: A Study of symbols and Terminology. Tübingen: Legat Verlag.

Copper handle covered with magnificent floral enamel design
Copper scabbard covered with magnificent floral enamel design
Brass handle covered with magnificent floral enamel design
Copper scabbard covered with magnificent floral enamel design

A Persian pishqabz from Iran fromfirst half of the 19th century.  The State Hermitage Museum states that its scabbard was made in Russia in 1850.  It was acquired in 1919 and was formerly held in the Chertkov collection. The handle scales are made of walrus ivory.  The blade is made of patterned crucible steel blade with a T-spine back and a typical S-shaped curve of a pishqabz dagger.  The scabbard is made of wood covered with velvet.  The scabbard chape and mouth are made of silver. The forte of the bladee is decorated with gold-overlaid floral design.  

 

For similar Persian pishqabz see Khorasani (2006, cat 261, cat. 263):

Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr (2006). Arms and Armor from Iran: The Bronze Age to the End of the Qajar Period.  Tübingen: Legat Verlag.

 

For a similar piece see Khorasani (2013, Cat. 18):

Moshtagh Khorasani (2013). Persian Archery and Swordsmanship: Historical Martial Arts of Iran.  Frankfurt am Main: Niloufar Books.

Pishqabz: the blade is made of patterned crucible steel.  The handle scalees are made of walrus ivory.  The base of the blade and handle straps (tangband) are engraved in floral design.  The wooden scabbard is covered with chagrin leather with typical geometrical design of Persian scabbards.  This dagger is from Iran from early 19th century, It was acquired in 1885-1886 from the Armoury of Tsarskoye Selo.

For similar Persian pishqabz see Khorasani (2006, cat 262 and cat. 265):

Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr (2006). Arms and Armor from Iran: The Bronze Age to the End of the Qajar Period.  Tübingen: Legat Verlag.

 

A curved kard: The handle scales are made of walrus ivory and beautifully carved.  the blade is made of patterned crucible steel. The base of the blade is decorated with gold-overlaid floral design.  For a similar curved Persian kard see Khorasani (2013, Cat. 17):

Moshtagh Khorasani (2013). Persian Archery and Swordsmanship: Historical Martial Arts of Iran.  Frankfurt am Main: Niloufar Books.

 

For a Persian kard with a carved handle see Khorasani (2013, Cat. 16):

Moshtagh Khorasani (2013). Persian Archery and Swordsmanship: Historical Martial Arts of Iran.  Frankfurt am Main: Niloufar Books.

 

Khanjar: The blade is made of patterned crucible steel.  The handle scales are made of walrus ivorty and beautifully carved.  This dagger is from Iran from the 19th century.  It is from the Winter Palace.

For similar Persian khanjars with carved handles see Khorasani (2006, cat 218-226):

Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr (2006). Arms and Armor from Iran: The Bronze Age to the End of the Qajar Period.  Tübingen: Legat Verlag.

 

For other similar pieces see 

For another enamelled Persian khanjar see Khorasani (2010, cat. 16):

Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr (2010). Lexicon of Arms and Armour from Iran: A Study of symbols and Terminology. Tübingen: Legat Verlag.

Carved walrus ivory handle in typical farangisazi style of the Qajar period
Carved walrus ivory handle of the curved kard in a typical farangisazi style of the Qajar period

A Persian Kard with a blade made of patterned crucible steel.  The handle scales are made of walrus ivory. The wooden sccabrd is covered with velvet,  The scabbard chape and mouth are made of gold covered with enamel. Iran.  Early - mid 19th century.  This kard is made by Mohammad Hossein.  Acquired in 1885-1886 from the Armoury of Tarskoye Selo.

For an enamelled Persian kard see Khorasani (2006, cat 254-255):

Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr (2006). Arms and Armor from Iran: The Bronze Age to the End of the Qajar Period.  Tübingen: Legat Verlag.

 

For an article on Persian kard see:

Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr(2008). Edged Weapons: The Persian Kārd.Classic Arms and Militaria, Volume XV Issue 2, pp. 25–29.

The golden scabbard chape decorated with painted enamel in floral design
The golden scabbard mouth decorated with painted enamel in floral design

A magnificent persian kard (knife) from the State Hermitage of Museum (Saint petersburg, Russian Federation). This is a late 18 century kard which was acquired from the Armoury of Tsarskoye Selo in 1885-1886. The handle slabs are made of walrus ivory. The blade is made of Persian crucible steel and has a reinforced tip. The forte of the blade is engraved with floral design. Two gold-inlaid flowers on each side of the handle extension of steel can be seen. Each flower has four golden petals. The wooden scabbard is covered with velvet and emboidered with pearls. The scabbard mouth and chape are made of silver. 

For a similar piece see 

For another enamelled Persian khanjar see Khorasani (2010, cat. 30):

Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr (2010). Lexicon of Arms and Armour from Iran: A Study of symbols and Terminology. Tübingen: Legat Verlag.

 

For similar Persian kards see Khorasani (2006, cat 236, cat. 237, cat. 240, cat. 241,  and cat. 265):

Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr (2006). Arms and Armor from Iran: The Bronze Age to the End of the Qajar Period.  Tübingen: Legat Verlag.

 

For another article on Persian kard see

Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr (2008). Waffe und Luxusgegenstand. Messer Magazin, April/Mai 2008, pp. 80–84.

Pattern of crucible steel blade of the pishqabz

Set of Kard knives (shakshaki): Three kards.  The middle one fits into the handle of the big one and the small one fits in the handle of the middle one.  The blades are made of crucible steel.  The handles of the big and middle knives are also made of crucible steel. The handle of the small kard is made of scales of walrus ivory. The handles and bolsters are partially gold-overlaid. This kard set was made in Iran in19th century.  They are from the Winter Palace.

 

For another article on Persian kard see:

Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr(2008). Kārds for Kings: The Magnificent Persian Kārd: A Symbol of Power and Beauty.Tactical Knives, pp.50-53.

A beautiful Persian kard with a blade made of patterened crucible steel.  The handle is made of cornelian and inlaid with rubies.  The scabbard has a a leather suspension cord with a golden knob. Iran, 19th century. It was acquired in 1885-1886 from the Armoury of Tsarskoye Selo.

 

For another article on Persian kard see:

Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr (2009). Kārd-e Irāni: Namād-e Zerāfat va Zibāyi [Persian Kard: A Delicate Symbol of Beauty]. Translated into Persian by Ashraf Haji.Dānešmand [Scientist], Māhnāme-ye Dey 1388 [December 2009 Issue], 555, pp. 61- 65.

Cornelian handle of the kard

An all-steel Persian khanjar.  The handle is decorated with silver-overlaid floral design.  The base of the blade is decorated with gold-overlaid floral design.  The blade ends in multiples heads/tips.  The main central tip is gold-overlaid.  The scabbard is also made of steel.  Iran, Mid 19th century.  It was acquired in 1885-1886 from the Armoury of Tsarskoye Selo.

 

For a similar Persian khanjar see Khorasani (2006, cat 235):

Moshtagh Khorasani, Manouchehr (2006). Arms and Armor from Iran: The Bronze Age to the End of the Qajar Period.  Tübingen: Legat Verlag.

silver-overlaid floral design of the steel handle

Dr. Manouchehr Moshtagh Khorasani